the-science-llama:

Hubble has identified the true visible-light color of a giant Jupiter-sized planet located 63 light-years away. 
The planet has a cobalt blue color and this color comes from, not oceans, but glass. It has 4,500mph winds that are so hot they melt silicates into raindrops of molten glass.
Read more at NASA Hubble

the-science-llama:

Hubble has identified the true visible-light color of a giant Jupiter-sized planet located 63 light-years away. 

The planet has a cobalt blue color and this color comes from, not oceans, but glass. It has 4,500mph winds that are so hot they melt silicates into raindrops of molten glass.

Read more at NASA Hubble

(via gravitationalbeauty)

skybird99:

Here, have a collection of photographs of people with extensive head damage for your visual pleasure (or, in some people’s cases, repulsion)

Photographs taken at the National Army Medical Museum, MD

(via xoghostgirl)

jtotheizzoe:

Looking for life through a straw. Kepler, that exoplanet-hunting telescope that is currently looking at a not-so-bright future after a major mechanical failure, only ever gazed at a tiny portion of the sky.
To date, it has found 134 confirmed exoplanets, and over 3,000 candidates, by looking for small dips in star intensity as far-off worlds pass in front of their stars.
Imagine how much more there is to discover. 
(via NASA)

jtotheizzoe:

Looking for life through a straw. Kepler, that exoplanet-hunting telescope that is currently looking at a not-so-bright future after a major mechanical failure, only ever gazed at a tiny portion of the sky.

To date, it has found 134 confirmed exoplanets, and over 3,000 candidates, by looking for small dips in star intensity as far-off worlds pass in front of their stars.

Imagine how much more there is to discover. 

(via NASA)

(via gravitationalbeauty)

chalkandbiners:

Mayan Smith-Gobat on Passport to Insanity, 28, The Grampians, Australia.
Photo from: Adidas Outdoors

chalkandbiners:

Mayan Smith-Gobat on Passport to Insanity, 28, The Grampians, Australia.

Photo from: Adidas Outdoors

(via efixroy)

astronomicalwonders:

Galaxy Messier 101
This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 101 is a composite of views from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Each wavelength region shows different aspects of celestial objects and often reveals new objects that could not otherwise be studied. The red color shows Spitzer’s view in infrared light. It highlights the heat emitted by dust lanes in the galaxy where stars can form. The yellow color is Hubble’s view in visible light. Most of this light comes from stars, and they trace the same spiral structure as the dust lanes. The blue color shows Chandra’s view in X-ray light. Sources of X-rays include million-degree gas, exploded stars, and material colliding around black holes. Such composite images allow astronomers to see how features seen in one wavelength match up with those seen in another wavelength. It’s like seeing with a camera, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at once.
Credit: NASA, ESA, CXC, SSC, and STScI

astronomicalwonders:

Galaxy Messier 101

This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 101 is a composite of views from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Each wavelength region shows different aspects of celestial objects and often reveals new objects that could not otherwise be studied. The red color shows Spitzer’s view in infrared light. It highlights the heat emitted by dust lanes in the galaxy where stars can form. The yellow color is Hubble’s view in visible light. Most of this light comes from stars, and they trace the same spiral structure as the dust lanes. The blue color shows Chandra’s view in X-ray light. Sources of X-rays include million-degree gas, exploded stars, and material colliding around black holes. Such composite images allow astronomers to see how features seen in one wavelength match up with those seen in another wavelength. It’s like seeing with a camera, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at once.

Credit: NASA, ESA, CXC, SSC, and STScI

(via setbabiesonfire)

upon-the-shores:

its nearly 4am and im still doing this #dedication 

upon-the-shores:

its nearly 4am and im still doing this #dedication 

(via xoghostgirl)

explorationimages:

India & the Mideast, taken by the Mars Colour Camera on India’s Mars Orbiter Mission, which is set to depart Earth orbit on November 30th.

spaceplasma:

Pastel Rings

The rings of Saturn have puzzled astronomers since Galileo Galilei discovered them with his telescope in 1610. Detailed study by the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft in the 1980s only increased the mystery.

There are billions of ring particles in the entire ring system. The ring particle sizes range from tiny, dust-sized icy grains to a few particles as large as mountains. Two tiny moons orbit in gaps (Encke and Keeler gaps) in the rings and keep the gaps open. Other particles (10s to 100s of meters) are too tiny to see, but create propeller-shaped objects in the rings that let us know they are there. The rings are believed to be pieces of comets, asteroids or shattered moons that broke up before they reached the planet. Each ring orbits at a different speed around the planet. Information from NASA’s Cassini mission will help reveal how they formed, how they maintain their orbit and, above all, why they are there in the first place.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

(via setbabiesonfire)

distant-traveller:

Snow in an infant planetary system

A snow line has been imaged in a far-off infant planetary system for the very first time. The snow line, located in the disc around the Sun-like star TW Hydrae, promises to tell us more about the formation of planets and comets, the factors that decide their composition, and the history of the Solar System.
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have taken the first ever image of the snow line in an infant planetary system. On Earth, snow lines form at high altitudes where falling temperatures turn the moisture in the air into snow. This line is clearly visible on a mountain, where the snow-capped summit ends and the rocky face begins.
The snow lines around young stars form in a similar way, in the distant, colder reaches of the dusty discs from which planetary systems form. Starting from the star and moving outwards, water (H2O) is the first to freeze, forming the first snow line. Further out from the star, as temperatures drop, more exotic molecules can freeze and turn to snow, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO). These different snows give the dust grains a sticky outer coating and play an essential role in helping the grains to overcome their usual tendency to break up in collisions, allowing them to become the crucial building blocks of planets and comets. The snow also increases how much solid matter is available and may dramatically speed up the planetary formation process.
Each of these different snow lines — for water, carbon dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide — may be linked to the formation of particular kinds of planets. Around a Sun-like star in a planetary system like our own, the water snow line would correspond to a distance between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, and the carbon monoxide snow line would correspond to the orbit of Neptune.
The snow line spotted by ALMA is the first glimpse of the carbon monoxide snow line, around TW Hydrae, a young star 175 light-years away from Earth. Astronomers believe this budding planetary system shares many of the same characteristics of the Solar System when it was just a few million years old.

Image credit: B. Saxton & A. Angelich/NRAO/AUI/NSF/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

distant-traveller:

Snow in an infant planetary system

A snow line has been imaged in a far-off infant planetary system for the very first time. The snow line, located in the disc around the Sun-like star TW Hydrae, promises to tell us more about the formation of planets and comets, the factors that decide their composition, and the history of the Solar System.

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have taken the first ever image of the snow line in an infant planetary system. On Earth, snow lines form at high altitudes where falling temperatures turn the moisture in the air into snow. This line is clearly visible on a mountain, where the snow-capped summit ends and the rocky face begins.

The snow lines around young stars form in a similar way, in the distant, colder reaches of the dusty discs from which planetary systems form. Starting from the star and moving outwards, water (H2O) is the first to freeze, forming the first snow line. Further out from the star, as temperatures drop, more exotic molecules can freeze and turn to snow, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO). These different snows give the dust grains a sticky outer coating and play an essential role in helping the grains to overcome their usual tendency to break up in collisions, allowing them to become the crucial building blocks of planets and comets. The snow also increases how much solid matter is available and may dramatically speed up the planetary formation process.

Each of these different snow lines — for water, carbon dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide — may be linked to the formation of particular kinds of planets. Around a Sun-like star in a planetary system like our own, the water snow line would correspond to a distance between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, and the carbon monoxide snow line would correspond to the orbit of Neptune.

The snow line spotted by ALMA is the first glimpse of the carbon monoxide snow line, around TW Hydrae, a young star 175 light-years away from Earth. Astronomers believe this budding planetary system shares many of the same characteristics of the Solar System when it was just a few million years old.

Image credit: B. Saxton & A. Angelich/NRAO/AUI/NSF/ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

(via gravitationalbeauty)

Finally getting some little bell peppers. :)

Finally getting some little bell peppers. :)

New foot jammer. Done by Scott at Nemisis, in Iowa City.

New foot jammer. Done by Scott at Nemisis, in Iowa City.

got to see my little boy monday. <3__<3

got to see my little boy monday. <3__<3

vegan-yums:

Vegan nutella, banana and brownie parfait / Recipe

(Source: vegan-yums)

mightyprofessor:

thecatsmustbecrazy:

ahoy

Cat-tantic